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Titanic VS Modern Cruise Ships

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The Titanic's only voyage ended in tragedy on April fifteenth, 1912. At the time of the disaster, it was the largest and most advanced ship ever constructed. Designed to carry more than 2,400 passengers and almost 900 crewmembers, the Titanic had certainly earned its name.
But with over a century of advancement, how are today’s cruise ships different from those of Titanic’s day? Sure, we all know they’re now required to carry more lifeboats, but that isn’t exactly what makes them the life of the party.
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TIMESTAMPS:
A ship that stole the Titanic's crown 1:14
The largest cruise ship in 2019 1:56
What's the difference between ocean liners... 2:29
... and cruise liners? 4:17
How was the Titanic built? 5:58
And how are built modern ships? 7:27
#ships #titanic #brightside
SUMMARY:
- The Titanic stretched 882 ft from bow to stern and had a beam, or width, of 92 ft. The ship’s nine decks rose to an impressive 175 ft.
- The SS Imperator would steal its crown a year later when it undertook his maiden voyage in 1913.
- As of 2019, the largest cruise ship in the world is the Symphony of the Seas, which is operated by Royal Caribbean.
- 1184 ft across and 215 ft wide, her eighteen decks are double the Titanic’s height and provide spacious accommodations for well over five thousand passengers.
- Think of it as the difference between a city bus and a tour bus. You board a cruise ship to have fun and an ocean liner when you need to get somewhere.
- First-class passengers would enjoy a saltwater pool, spa, gymnasium, and multiple restaurants decorated in the styles of French cafés and swanky New York hotels.
- Second-class rooms were smaller and not as glamorous, but luxuriously furnished.
- Third Class, also known as steerage, wasn't quite so luxurious, although the accommodations were still nicer than on many ships of the same era.
- Modern cruise ships don’t really have classes in the way as the Titanic or even modern airlines.
- Even the least expensive room on a cruise ship is still going to be about the level of a modest hotel room.
- In addition to TVs and in-room slides, there are many other amenities found on modern cruise ships that wouldn’t have been available in the early twentieth century.
- Shipbuilding had to come a long way before these immense mobile vacation spots became a reality.
- The Titanic was constructed in Belfast harbor on a special slipway built specifically to accommodate its unprecedented bulk.
- The hull of the Titanic was made up of thousands of these overlapping plates with the lower hull consisting of two layers.
- Titanic's primary safety feature was the sixteen watertight compartments making up the lower decks.
- Ships of today are still made from steel, but advancements in smelting and metallurgy have resulted in hulls stronger and less brittle than were possible a hundred years ago.
- Speaking of the engines, modern cruise ships run primarily on either diesel, natural gas, or some combination of the two.
- The most unusual aspect of modern cruise construction is that they're not built hull to funnel as a single construction.
- The largest cruise ships and oil tankers are assembled in just six locations worldwide, the most prolific being the Hyundai Heavy Industries shipyard in South Korea.
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